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Björk: 'It’s no coincidence that the porn industry has embraced virtual reality' | Music | The Guardian

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Search with google Make a contribution Subscribe International edition switch to the UK edition switch to the US edition switch to the Australia edition Search jobs Holidays Digital Archive Discount Codes Guardian Puzzles app The Guardian app Video Podcasts Pictures Newsletters Today's paper Inside the Guardian The Observer Guardian Weekly Crosswords Facebook Twitter Search jobs Holidays Digital Archive Discount Codes Guardian Puzzles app Books Music TV & radio Art & design Film Games Classical Stage More Björk Interview Björk: 'It’s no coincidence that the porn industry has embraced virtual reality' Brigid Delaney Before the world premiere of her new VR work, the Icelandic musician speaks about nature, technology and her habits on Airbnb @BrigidWD Fri 3 Jun 2016 04.01 BST Last modified on Thu 22 Feb 2018 10.28 GMT Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email Bjork will premiere her video work Notget at Vivid Sydney 2016. Photograph: Santiago Felipe B jörk carries something of the Bowie gene: more stardust, rainbow particles and creative genius than flesh and bone. She is a youthful 50 – ageless as she is timeless – and with her high-pitched voice, irrepressible enthusiasm and unconventional sartorial choices, it’s hard to remember a time when the Icelandic singer didn’t stake a claim on the musical landscape. Few among those musical stars that came of age in the 90s have evolved in such complex and interesting ways, carrying their old fans into the future and picking up a whole heap of new ones along the way. A clue to her evolution may lie in her unusual collaborations with designers, scientists, software developers, composers, instrument makers, app makers and film directors. Last year Björk released a heartbreak album, rawer than anything by Adele. Vulnicura – Latin for “cure for wounds” – is the artist’s lament for the end of her marriage in 2013 to American artist Matthew Barney, and is just as exposed as the deep wound featured on her chest adorning the album’s cover. Best albums of 2015: No 5 – Vulnicura by Björk Read more Björk is in Australia for Vivid Sydney with the world premiere of Björk Digital, an exhibition comprising large-scale and immersive digital and video works, including her virtual reality film clips for Mouth Mantra and Stonemilker, and an exclusive first-look at Notget – still a work in progress, the singer revealed at a media call on Thursday, but one which uses the latest in VR technology. The exhibition also includes Black Lake, an elaborate music video commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York for its Björk retrospective last year; restaged at Carriageworks in a larger space, the work is being showcased on huge screens and through 54 speakers. She spoke to Guardian Australia ahead of the show’s launch. Guardian Australia: Vulnicura chronicles your grief after your marriage broke down. Did you mean to write such a confessional album? Björk: After I did my album [I realised] what sort of album I had on my hands. It was a Greek tragedy, it was chronological, there was a story that ran through it. It was definitely not planned. But when a friend of mine gave me a totally generic book about grief and loss [Seven Stages of Grieving], that sold millions of copies – where you come out and you are reborn – I used it as a tool. Instead of trying to hide [my emotions] I thought, this will be the spine of the album. Facebook Twitter Pinterest A still from Björk’s virtual reality clip for Black Lake. Photograph: Andrew Thomas Huang You have such a huge variety of music and projects. Have you ever been tempted to simply stick with one thing? You have to redefine yourself every year because it’s like anything: if you work something out and keep it that way, it’s not true to who you are in three years’ time. I try to look forward to the next thing. As much as we would like to lie in bed, we have to keep going. Bob Dylan said: “If you are not busy being born, you are busy dying.” It would be nice to skip this search and this longing, and just skip forward until you are dead, but that’s not an option. So I just wake up in the morning and stick my nose out and see where it will take me. How do you balance your public persona with privacy? All of us have to find this line, not just musicians or public people. When you go to swimming pools in Iceland everyone is naked in showers together and when Americans come in, they freak out. When it comes to what is revealing and what isn’t, go with what feels right. I’ve tried to follow my instincts. Maybe in the beginning I was over-generous and thinking that it was a virtue, but I learned the hard way it isn’t a virtue. It would be nice to give everything all the time; that would be easy and you wouldn’t have to use your brain. It would also be incredibly boring, and would damage what you are trying to do. It’s something we all have to do: baby step, every day. [For example], do I tell the secret to my mum, or keep my sex life to myself, or do I talk about periods? We have to take it week by week. It’s the same with my job. What does virtual reality add to the experience of listening to music? When I started working on virtual reality, it was a home for my music. It’s a journey you are on: the fact that you have your own theatre and you have this psychological drama. Facebook Twitter Pinterest A still from the film clip to Mouth Mantra, which was shot from inside the mouth of Björk. Photograph: Jesse Kanda At the same time, I realised it would be a couple of years before people would have this technology in their homes. It would be an impossible feat to do – it’s like going to the moon. I thought, OK, the way to do it is for people to have a place to go to and watch the videos, and it would be like a workshop and work-in-progress and if people want to see it, they can have somewhere to come. The older I get the more I understand what is special about how we experience music. It’s either one-on-one, or thousands of people at a festival where you lose yourself. It’s not intellectual, it’s impulsive. Virtual reality is a natural continuity of that. It has a lot of intimacy. As a musician to be intimate is really important. If you want to express certain details, it’s an opportunity to do that. It’s no coincidence that the porn industry has embraced virtual reality. The penetration is really intimate. It’s really exciting to place to be. Do you ever go listen to your back catalogue? There’s a lot of maintenance with what I do: you have to fix the roof and pay the bills, and I have to do this as a musician too. For example, someone’s done a mix of mine and I have to listen to it and make sure it’s all right – so I do spend time doing maintenance. I look at it as a form of protection, protecting my music. I probably do 50% new stuff and 50% maintenance. Recently I had to mix my live album and that took a whole month. I was really annoyed because I wanted to write new songs. You recently did a documentary with David Attenborough. How concerned are you about climate change? Everybody wants to save the planet. By now the dinosaur conservatives are in a minority, but overall people don’t know where to start. The biggest hurdle is the functionality of it. What should happen now is the government says: “OK, we are in an emergency now and everyone has to walk everywhere.” There will be no cars – a whole list of things. The way we switch to the new way of living has to be so drastic. It’s like with the coal in London, because people couldn’t breathe. When it was banned, things actually did change but change came from above. Something like that has to happen. You seem very connected to nature. What’s your relationship to it? Where I was brought up in Iceland I could just walk across the street to a mountain area where I could hike or sing. It was a lot of space, and I could see forever. Facebook Twitter Pinterest A still from Stonemilker. Photograph: Andrew Thomas Huang For me, personally, I am used to this idea of space. It’s a habit. It’s not like I have to hunt every animal I eat, it’s not that dramatic. It’s equilibrium. I am more used to being in nature. I feel normal. In cities I feel like I am holding my breath. I feel claustrophobic, like I am living in an airport. I love every natural situation but my job has pulled me into every city in the world. It can be tough sometimes. When I travel, I try to get Airbnb houses by the ocean or beaches. I find New York a bit tricky. I only spend two to three months in Brooklyn each year. I have figured out a way to make it work. Are you taking in any nature sights while you’re in Sydney? I am not here for so long. I went to Botanical Gardens to see the fruit bats and I was very disappointed because it’s not the right season. You’ve had 24 years in the business now – are you mentoring any younger musicians? In the last three years I have experienced something totally new that I never thought I’d experience but fellow musicians in their 20s are coming to me and asking me for advice and help, and I feel really natural giving it. It was different when they were 10 years younger than me. There was more tension, but there is something different where there is a 20-year gap. It is really satisfying to be some sort of teacher and have pupils. I have a lot of experience, and I can tell them not to do something that’s wasting their time. But it’s great how mutual it is, how it goes both ways, when the pupil teaches the teacher. • Björk Digital is at Vivid Sydney from 4 June to 18 June • This article was amended on 3 June 2016. An earlier version referred to Matthew Barney as British rather than American. Topics Björk Pop and rock Electronic music Sydney New South Wales Vivid festival 2016 features Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Share on Pinterest Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger Reuse this content View all comments > Order by newest oldest recommendations Show 25 25 50 100 All Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded Loading comments… Trouble loading? View more comments more on this story Björk: ‘People miss the jokes. A lot of it is me taking the piss out of myself’ The Icelandic icon gives us a sneak listen to her new album, Utopia, and talks about creative control, the trouble with men – and Friday flute club Published: 12 Nov 2017 Björk: ‘People miss the jokes. A lot of it is me taking the piss out of myself’ Björk reveals more details of alleged sexual harassment by director The musician published a second Facebook post discussing specific encounters, including ‘whispered sexual offers with graphic descriptions’ Published: 17 Oct 2017 Björk reveals more details of alleged sexual harassment by director Björk’s The Gate: perhaps the Björkiest thing that’s ever Björked Also this week: Morrissey is back with a belter, while greatness is so near yet so far for Wolf Alice Published: 29 Sep 2017 Björk’s The Gate: perhaps the Björkiest thing that’s ever Björked Björk announces new album: 'This is like my Tinder record' Icelandic singer marks a change in mood from her breakup album Vulnicura, saying her new songs are about being in love Published: 4 Aug 2017 Björk announces new album: 'This is like my Tinder record' Björk: ‘I build bridges between tech and the human things we do’ Published: 31 Aug 2016 Björk: ‘I build bridges between tech and the human things we do’ Björk virtual reality exhibition to go on show at Somerset House Published: 19 Jul 2016 Björk virtual reality exhibition to go on show at Somerset House Björk Digital review – singer’s past, present and future unveiled amid fans and foliage 4 out of 5 stars. Published: 4 Jun 2016 Björk Digital review – singer’s past, present and future unveiled amid fans and foliage Bjork's Biophilia becomes first app in New York's Museum of Modern Art Published: 12 Jun 2014 Bjork's Biophilia becomes first app in New York's Museum of Modern Art More more on this story Most popular Books Music TV & radio Art & design Film Games Classical Stage News Opinion Sport Culture Lifestyle Contact us Complaints & corrections SecureDrop Work for us Privacy policy Cookie policy Terms & conditions Help All topics All writers Digital newspaper archive Facebook Twitter Advertise with us Search UK jobs Discount Codes Support The Guardian Available for everyone, funded by readers Contribute Subscribe Back to top © 2020 Guardian News & Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. Close

The 10 best Bjork music videos

Bjorbekk From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation Jump to search Village in Southern Norway, NorwayBjorbekkVillageView of the villageBjorbekkLocation of the villageShow map of Aust-Agder BjorbekkBjorbekk (Norway)Show map of Norway Coordinates: 58°26′29″N 8°42′32″E  /  58.4414°N 08.7090°E  / 58.4414; 08.7090 Coordinates: 58°26′29″N 8°42′32″E  /  58.4414°N 08.7090°E  / 58.4414; 08.7090 CountryNorwayRegionSouthern NorwayCountyAust-AgderDistrictØstre AgderMunicipalityArendalElevation[1]32 m (105 ft)Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET) • Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)Post Code4824 Bjorbekk Bjorbekk is a village in Arendal municipality in Aust-Agder county, Norway. The village is located between the Norwegian County Road 407 and the European route E18 highway. The village of Vrengen lies just east of Bjorbekk and the village of Asdal lies just to the south. Bjorbekk Church is located in the village. References [ edit] ^ "Bjorbekk, Arendal (Aust-Agder)". yr.no. Retrieved 2017-12-03 . This Agder location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.vte Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bjorbekk&oldid=945143162" Categories: Villages in Aust-AgderArendalAgder geography stubsHidden categories: Articles with short descriptionShort description matches WikidataCoordinates on WikidataAll stub articles Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog in Namespaces ArticleTalk Variants Views ReadEditView history More Search Navigation Main pageContentsCurrent eventsRandom articleAbout WikipediaContact usDonateWikipedia store Contribute HelpCommunity portalRecent changesUpload file Tools What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationCite this pageWikidata item Print/export Download as PDFPrintable version In other projects Wikimedia Commons Languages CebuanoJawaBahasa MelayuNederlandsNorsk bokmål Edit links This page was last edited on 12 March 2020, at 02:15 (UTC) . Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Contact Wikipedia Mobile view Developers Statistics Cookie statement

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Some of the "Björkest" moments of Björk - YouTube

Go to the content Go to the footer Close New York icon-chevron-right New York Things to Do Food & Drink Culture Travel Time In Time Out Market Your Perfect Summer More icon-chevron-right News Kids Attractions Museums Restaurants Bars Movies Music Art Theater Comedy Dance City Guide Hotels Neighborhoods Video Tickets TO Book Classes Magazine Sweepstakes Venue Rental Popular cities icon-chevron-right London New York Paris Chicago Los Angeles Lisbon Hong Kong Sydney Melbourne Porto Singapore Barcelona Madrid Montreal Boston Miami Browse all cities en es New York icon-chevron-right Popular cities London New York Paris Chicago Los Angeles Lisbon Hong Kong Sydney Melbourne Porto Singapore Barcelona Madrid Montreal Boston Miami Browse all cities en icon-chevron-right English Español Time Out New York Subscribe Get us in your inbox Sign up to our newsletter for the latest and greatest from your city and beyond Déjà vu! We already have this email. Try another? 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My Account My Profile Sign out My Account Search Things to Do Food & Drink Culture Travel Time In Time Out Market Your Perfect Summer Separator News Kids Attractions Museums Restaurants Bars Movies Music Art Theater Comedy Dance City Guide Hotels Neighborhoods Video Tickets TO Book Classes Magazine Sweepstakes Venue Rental More Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right The 10 best Bjork music videos The 10 best Bjork music videos By David Ehrlich Posted: Tuesday March 3 2015, 4:08pm RSS Share Tweet Advertising On March 8, MoMA will launch an expansive midcareer retrospective that looks back on two decades of Björk’s visual work. This exhibit is but the latest evidence that Björk is one of the film world’s most innovative forces of nature—the Icelandic swanstress may only need one name, but her boundless creativity can hardly be confined to one medium. Best known for her music, in which the eternal howl of her voice anchors peerlessly progressive uses of modern technology to an indivisible human core, Björk has supplemented each of her nine solo albums with an array of iconic music videos. In addition to being one of the first artists to meaningfully explore the aesthetic and semiotic value of CG and its relationship to the body, Björk has collaborated with the likes of Michel Gondry, Spike Jonze and Chris Cunningham, pushing these directors toward their potential. She’s the first person of any kind to have an app inducted into MoMA’s permanent collection, and—as if that weren’t enough—she also starred in the best episode of Space Ghost Coast 2 Coast. Insanely, Björk’s contributions to the world of moving images are so immense that her landmark performance in Lars von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark (for which she won the Best Actress prize at Cannes) is little more than a superfluous detail. Follow along below as we count down Björk's 10 best music videos.    10. “Who Is It?” (Dir. Dawn Shadforth, 2004) Medúlla, Björk’s sixth album, is famous for being almost entirely comprised of sounds produced by human vocal chords (and if you think that’s just a fancy way of saying “a cappella,” scroll down this list and listen to “Triumph of a Heart”). Fittingly, the music video for the record’s first single puts that idea front and center, Björk dancing around a vast field of volcanic ash while wearing a cylindrical dress that’s entirely covered in bells. Looking like a cross between a medieval knight and an ornamental beekeeper, she becomes a visual expression of how Medúlla repurposes the body as an instrument of infinite potential. Björk literally plays herself. And then she gets to hang out with two dogs, because why not. 9. “It’s Oh So Quiet” (Dir. Spike Jonze, 1995) Almost certainly the least interesting song on Björk’s second solo album, Post, “It’s Oh So Quiet” has nevertheless become one of her most ubiquitous tracks because of the video Spike Jonze made for it. Björk has almost never been as emotionally broad as she sounds in this full-throated cover of a 1951 Betty Hutton B-side, and Jonze immediately connected the exuberance of her vocal performance with the all-singing, all-dancing splendor of Jacques Demy’s classic musicals (particularly Les Demoiselles de Rochefort). Like Demy, Jonze mines the magical from the mundane, transforming a drab auto shop into a location of euphoric release, complete with a full dance company, a Björk stunt-double doing a backflip, and dancing mailboxes that Jonze must have borrowed from Michel Gondry. But none of this would have worked without that final crane shot. 8. “Declare Independence” (Dir. Michel Gondry, 2007) “Declare Independence” is a song typical of Volta, Björk’s weakest record, in that it paradoxically feels at once both physical and hollow. Be that as it may, anyone who’s seen the track performed live knows that Björk means every damn word of it, and Michel Gondry’s music video captures that feeling by making this feral call to arms the anthem that it always wanted to be. Hyperpolitical without beating you over the head about it, the pounding clip traces the relationship between art, protest and change, compactly collecting all of these parts into a single machine, the controls of which are up for grabs. The apparatus is a work of art unto itself, and the splash of green paint that nails the camera lens at the end is a perfect expression of the energy that it can produce.    7. “Cocoon” (Dir. Eiko Ishioka, 2001) One of the reasons why Björk has become such a singular artist is that she genuinely recognizes the value of collaboration—the people she pulls into her ever-expanding orbit are alchemists, not employees. The fact that the late, legendary designer Eiko Ishioka (Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters) directed a music video would be exciting regardless of whom she worked with, but it’s not an accident that she worked with Björk, and it’s truly special to see what these two women created together. Inspired by one of the most bluntly erotic tracks from Vespertine, Björk’s most sensual album (her recent Vulnicura is all about breaking up with Matthew Barney, and Vespertine is all about having sex with him), the “Cocoon” video isolates one pale nude Björk from a line-up of clones, and then essentially sends her to orgasm as she describes a lover “sliding inside” of her. Spewing strands of red licorice from her nipples (probably a special effect, but with Björk you can never be sure), Björk twirls and shapes them until the candied rope forms a protective seal around her body. The last in a series of videos in which Björk contended with organic matter escaping from her skin, Ishioka’s video captured a feeling the singer had been chasing for years. 6.  “Wanderlust” (Dir. Encyclopedia Pictura, 2007)  Probably one of the most work-intensive music videos ever made (and definitely one of the coolest), “Wanderlust” is staggering proof of how Björk’s creative restlessness empowers and motivates her collaborators. Given the technical insanity involved in making this thing (and the nine months it took to pull off), the musician placed a world of trust in the hands of Encyclopedia Pictura’s Sean Hellfritsch and Isaiah Saxon. The resulting video, which was made in 3-D, unfolds like a live-action Studio Ghibli film. If the song is about wanting to see more of the world, the video leaves ours behind entirely, transforming “Wanderlust” into a statement of its creator’s boundless imagination. Volta may not be Björk at her best, but watching this video was enough to make you glad she took the chance, and confident that she had lots of exciting things in store for the future.  5. “Pagan Poetry” (Dir. Nick Knight, 2001)  “Pagan Poetry” (or “The One Where Björk Has Ultrasound Sex and Pierces Her Nipples”) is a way-too-real visualization of how intensely she feels things. Björk is not a casual woman. Björk does not have the “So what are we?” conversation with you after three dates. When you make love to Björk, you damn well better be looking in her eyes. And—as her new album proves—should you dare to dump her, Björk will write the kind of songs about you that make Taylor Swift’s kiss-offs sound like Kidz Bop covers. So just remember, as you watch the lower half of Björk’s body sway in a beautiful Alexander McQueen dress while the upper half is chained together through all of its most delicate bits, that “Pagan Poetry” is her idea of a love song. And, should you be so brash as to doubt Björk’s dedication, know that she refused to use a body double. Director Nick Knight gave her a mini-DV camera and told her to “film your love life.” The footage in the video is what she brought back. 4. “Bachelorette” (Dir. Michel Gondry, 1997)  The most story-driven of Björk’s videos, “Bachelorette” is also the Michel Gondry-est of them all (and, considering that he’s collaborated with her seven times, there’s a lot of competition for that particular honor). A magnificent narrative short film that just happens to be set to music and sung through, the video ignores the fact that “Bachelorette” sounds like the greatest James Bond theme ever written and instead devotes itself to self-referentially exploring Björk’s celebrity and its collateral effects. A fable about a woman who finds a book in her garden that writes itself (she titles it “My Story”), “Bachelorette” uses all of Gondry’s favorite devices to blur the lines between Björk’s life and its representations, the director effectively sweding his star’s existence. Relying on a series of remarkable dioramas (that train!), Gondry empowers each piece of his set to transform from being something that’s part of the story into something that’s telling the story. Eventually, there are so many layers that Björk’s character is lost in the process, and she has to retreat from the theater of the city in order to regain herself. 3. “Big Time Sensuality” (Dir. Stéphane Sednaoui, 1993) Shot on the cusp of her celebrity, “Big Time Sensuality” is the clip that cemented Björk’s stardom, and exploded Debut into more than just a critical darling. Based on one of those ingeniously simple concepts that form the bedrock of so many all-time music videos, “Big Time Sensuality” is essentially just five minutes of a young Björk dancing on the exposed back of a flatbed truck as it drives through Manhattan. Shot in stark black and white and elevated by the city’s indifference (this would never work so well in the Instagram age), the video anticipates the confrontational courage that has made Björk’s career just as exciting to watch as it has been to hear. Also, if you squint, you can practically see Luc Besson (who used “Venus as a Boy” in The Professional) getting the idea for The Fifth Element's Leeloo Dallas.  2. “Triumph of a Heart” (Dir. Spike Jonze, 2004) Spike Jonze’s “Triumph of a Heart” may be at No. 2 on this list, but it sure feels like the greatest music video ever made while you’re watching it. Built upon the last track on Medúlla, it starts with Björk married to an emotionally neglectful cat who rocks a wifebeater better than anyone since Stanley Kowalski. Frustrated, Björk tears away from the remote Iceland house they share together and drives straight towards a wild night of drinking, human beatboxing, vandalism and low-key magic. All told, it feels like Jonze’s response to the karaoke set-piece at the heart of his ex-wife’s Lost in Translation. Eventually Björk goes home to her husband. They make up, they make out and then he grows six feet tall. The message is clear: Björk is an independent woman, but it’s always nice to have someone to dance with during breakfast. 1. “All Is Full of Love” (Dir. Chris Cunningham, 1997)  It doesn’t say much to call this one of the most iconic music videos ever made, because—given the relatively brief history of the format—that’s like saying, “This video matches the lofty heights of that little girl running around in the bee costume.” But the clip Björk developed with Chris Cunningham for the closing track of Homogenic, her greatest album, is the kind of work that doesn’t just define a medium, but also goes a long way towards justifying it. Based on a concept that Björk immediately called “perfect” before forcing Cunningham to start over, the video is best described as, um, robot sex.  Shot in 1997 and still looking like the future, “All is Full of Love” uses a more sensual cut of the song than the mix that’s on the album. It stars two milk-white robots being manufactured to do exactly one thing, the machines responsible for their creation continuing to tend to them as they make out in a power-draining montage of metallic caresses and reverse-speed cascades of android fluid. Cunningham’s Björk-bot and her partner essentially conduct a séance for the Ghost in the Shell—the video is so compelling because the synthetic sex sparks a genuine reaction, in turn casting doubt on the artifice of what we’re watching. Perhaps the video’s top YouTube comment said it best: “I got a boner and cried at the same time while the robots were kissing because the robots had a lot of passion.” Indeed.  Share the story Share Tweet Latest news More news Advertising Popular on Time Out Get us in your inbox Sign up to our newsletter for the latest and greatest from your city and beyond Déjà vu! We already have this email. Try another? 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