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Hessdalen - Wikipedia

Hessdalen lights From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Redirected from Hessdalen light) Jump to navigation Jump to search The Hessdalen lights are unexplained lights observed in a 12-kilometre-long (7.5 mi) stretch of the Hessdalen valley in rural central Norway.[1] Contents 1 History and description 2 Research 3 Hypotheses 3.1 Piezoelectricity 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External links History and description [ edit] The Hessdalen lights are of unknown origin. They appear both by day and by night, and seem to float through and above the valley. They are usually bright white, yellow or red and can appear above and below the horizon. The duration of the phenomenon may be a few seconds to well over an hour. Sometimes the lights move with enormous speed; at other times they seem to sway slowly back and forth. On yet other occasions, they hover in mid‑air. Unusual lights have been reported in the region since at least the 1930s.[2] Especially high activity occurred between December 1981 and mid-1984, during which the lights were being observed 15–20 times per week, attracting many overnight tourists who arrived in for a sighting.[3] As of 2010[update], the number of observations has dwindled, with only 10 to 20 sightings made yearly. Research [ edit] Since 1983, there has been ongoing scientific research, referred to as "Project Hessdalen", initiated by UFO-Norge and UFO-Sweden. This project was active as field investigations during 1983–1985. A group of students, engineers and journalists collaborated as "The Triangle Project" in 1997–1998 and recorded the lights in a pyramid shape that bounced up and down.[4][5] In 1998, the Hessdalen Automatic Measurement Station (Hessdalen AMS) was set up in the valley to register and record the appearance of lights. Later, a programme, named EMBLA, was initiated to bring together established scientists and students into researching these lights.[6][7] Leading research institutions are Østfold University College (Norway) and the Italian National Research Council. Hypotheses [ edit] Despite the ongoing research, there is no convincing explanation for the phenomenon. However, there are numerous working hypotheses and even more speculations. One possible explanation attributes the phenomenon to an incompletely understood combustion involving hydrogen, oxygen and sodium,[8] which occurs in Hessdalen because of the large deposits of scandium there.[9] One recent hypothesis suggests that the lights are formed by a cluster of macroscopic Coulomb crystals in a plasma produced by the ionization of air and dust by alpha particles during radon decay in the dusty atmosphere. Several physical properties including oscillation, geometric structure, and light spectrum, observed in the Hessdalen lights (HL) can be explained through a dust plasma model.[10] Radon decay produces alpha particles (responsible by helium emissions in HL spectrum) and radioactive elements such as polonium. In 2004, Teodorani[11] showed an occurrence where a higher level of radioactivity on rocks was detected near the area where a large light ball was reported. Computer simulations show that dust immersed in ionized gas can organize itself into double helixes like some occurrences of the Hessdalen lights; dusty plasmas may also form in this structure.[12] There have been some sightings positively identified as misperceptions of astronomical bodies, aircraft, car headlights and mirages.[1] Piezoelectricity [ edit] This section may be too technical for most readers to understand. Please help improve it to make it understandable to non-experts, without removing the technical details. (April 2016 ) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Another hypothesis explains Hessdalen lights as a product of piezoelectricity generated under specific rock strains,[a] because many crystal rocks in Hessdalen valley include quartz grains which produce an intense charge density.[10] In a 2011 paper, based on the dusty plasma theory of Hessdalen lights, Gerson Paiva and Carlton Taft suggested that piezoelectricity of quartz cannot explain a peculiar property assumed by the Hessdalen lights phenomenon – the presence of geometrical structures in its center.[14] Paiva and Taft have shown a mechanism of light ball cluster formation in Hessdalen lights by nonlinear interaction of ion-acoustic and dusty-acoustic waves with low frequency geoelectromagnetic waves in dusty plasmas. The theoretical velocity of ejected light balls is about 10,000 m/s (33,000 ft/s), in good agreement with the observed velocity of some ejected light balls, estimated at 20,000 m/s (66,000 ft/s).[15] The central ball is white, while the ejected balls that are observed are always green in colour. This is ascribed to radiation pressure produced by the interaction between very low frequency electromagnetic waves (VLF) and atmospheric ions (present in the central white-coloured ball) through ion-acoustic waves.[16] O+ 2 ions (electronic transition b4Σ− g → a4Πu ), with green emission lines, are probably the only ones transported by these waves. Electronic bands of O+ 2 ions occur in auroral spectra.[17] The estimated temperature of Hessdalen lights is about 5,000 K (4,730 °C; 8,540 °F).[11] At this temperature, the rate coefficients of dissociative recombination will be 10−8 cm3 s−1 for the oxygen ions, and 10−7 cm3 s−1 for the nitrogen ions.[b] Thus, in the Hessdalen lights plasma, the nitrogen ions will decompose (N+ 2 + e− → N + N*) more rapidly than oxygen ions. Only ionic species are transported by ion acoustic waves. Therefore, oxygen ions will dominate in the ejected green light balls in Hessdalen lights, presenting a negative band of O+ 2 with electronic transition b4Σ− g → a4Πu after ion-acoustic wave formation. Paiva and Taft presented a model for resolving the apparently contradictory spectrum observed in Hessdalen lights. The spectrum is nearly flat on the top with steep sides, due to the effect of optical thickness on the bremsstrahlung spectrum. At low frequencies self-absorption modifies the spectrum to follow the Rayleigh–Jeans part of the blackbody curve.[19] Such a spectrum is typical of dense ionized gas. Additionally, the spectrum produced in the thermal bremsstrahlung process is flat up to a cutoff frequency, νcut, and falls off exponentially at higher frequencies. This sequence of events forms the typical spectrum of Hessdalen lights phenomenon when the atmosphere is clear, with no fog. According to the model, the spatial color distribution of luminous balls commonly observed in Hessdalen lights phenomenon is produced by electrons accelerated by electric fields during rapid fracture of piezoelectric rocks under the ground.[20] See also [ edit] Aleya (Ghost light), Bengal Chir Batti Aurora Ball lightning Hessdalen AMS Marfa lights Paulding Light Will-o'-the-wisp St. Elmo's fire Naga fireballs Notes [ edit] ^ Based on 1998 research by Takaki and Ikeya.[13] ^ Using the measurements of electron–molecular ion dissociative recombination rate coefficients as functions of electron temperature and cross sections as a function of electron energy by Mehr and Biondi for N+ 2 and O+ 2 over the electron temperature interval 0.007–10 eV .[18] References [ edit] ^ a b Leone, Matteo (2003). "A rebuttal of the EMBLA 2002 report on the optical survey in Hessdalen" (PDF) . Comitato Italiano per il Progetto Hessdalen. pp. 1–29. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2014-02-07. ^ Zanotti, Ferruccio; Di Giuseppe, Massimiliano; Serra, Romano. "Hessdalen 2003: Luci Misteriose in Norvegia" (PDF) (in Italian). Comitato Italiano per il Progetto Hessdalen. pp. 4–5. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-01-04. ^ Pāvils, Gatis (2010-10-10). "Hessdalen lights". Wondermondo. Archived from the original on 2015-07-02. ^ Ballester Olmos, Vicente‑Juan; Brænne, Ole Jonny (2008). "11 October 1997". Norway in UFO Photographs: The First Catalogue. FOTOCAT. 4. Torino: UPIAR. p. 94. LCCN 2010388262. OCLC 713018022. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 December 2015. ^ Olsen, Andreas, ed. (1998). "The Triangle Project". Archived from the original on 2002-10-17. ^ "The EMBLA 2000 Mission in Hessdalen" (PDF) . PROJECT HESSDALEN HOMEPAGE. Retrieved 27 May 2019 . ^ MATTEO LEONE, talian Committee for Project Hessdalen (CIPH) scientific advisor. "A rebuttal of the EMBLA 2002 report on the optical survey in Hessdalen: Part Three" (PDF) . Italian Committee for Project Hessdale. ^ Johansen, Karl Hans (2007-07-16). "Fenomenet Hessdalen" (in Norwegian). Norsk rikskringkasting. Archived from the original on 2015-07-03. ^ Hauge, Bjørn Gitle (2007). Optical spectrum analysis of the Hessdalen phenomenon (PDF) (Report). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2014-08-30. ^ a b Paiva, Gerson S.; Taft, Carlton A. (2010). "A hypothetical dusty plasma mechanism of Hessdalen lights". Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. 72 (16): 1200–1203. Bibcode:2010JASTP..72.1200P. doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2010.07.022. ISSN 1364-6826. OCLC 5902956691. ^ a b Teodorani, Massimo (2004). "A Long-Term Scientific Survey of the Hessdalen Phenomenon" (PDF) . Journal of Scientific Exploration. 18 (2): 217–251. Bibcode:2004JSE....18..217T. ISSN 0892-3310. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-12-28. [unreliable source? ] ^ Johnston, Hamish (2007-08-15). "Helices swirl in space-dust simulations". Physics World. Archived from the original on 2016-01-10. ^ Takaki, Shunji; Ikeya, Motoji (15 September 1998). "A Dark Discharge Model of Earthquake Lightning". Japanese Journal of Applied Physics. 37 (9A): 5016–5020. Bibcode:1998JaJAP..37.5016T. doi:10.1143/JJAP.37.5016. ^ Paiva, Gerson S.; Taft, Carlton A. (2011). "Hessdalen Lights and Piezoelectricity from Rock Strain" (PDF) . Journal of Scientific Exploration. 25 (2): 265–271. ISSN 0892-3310. OCLC 761916772. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-12-28. [unreliable source? ] ^ Paiva, Gerson S.; Taft, Carlton A. (2012). "Cluster formation in Hessdalen lights". Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. 80: 336–339. Bibcode:2012JASTP..80..336P. doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2012.02.020. ISSN 1364-6826. OCLC 4934033386. ^ Paiva, Gerson S.; Taft, Carlton A. (2011). "Color Distribution of Light Balls in Hessdalen Lights Phenomenon". Journal of Scientific Exploration. 25 (4): 735–746. ISSN 0892-3310. [unreliable source? ] ^ Chamberlain, J.W., Physics of the Aurora and Air-glow (Academic Press Inc. , New York, 1961) ^ Mehr, F J; Biondi, M A (1969). "Electron temperature dependence of recombination O+ 2 and N+ 2 ions with electrons". Phys. Rev. 181: 264–271. doi:10.1103/physrev.181.264. ^ Paiva, Gerson S.; Taft, Carlton A. (2012). "A mechanism to explain the spectrum of Hessdalen Lights phenomenon". Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics. 117 (1–2): 1–4. Bibcode:2012MAP...117....1P. doi:10.1007/s00703-012-0197-5. ^ Paiva, Gerson S.; Taft, C. A (2011). "Color Distribution of Light Balls in Hessdalen Lights Phenomenon". J. Sc. Expl. 25: 735. External links [ edit] Homepage of Project Hessdalen Project Hessdalen Bulletin, 1983–1985 vteUFOs Ufology Index of ufology articles Claimed sightingsGeneral List of reported UFO sightings Sightings in outer space Pre-20th century Tulli Papyrus (possibly 15th century B.C.) Ezekiel's Wheel (circa 622–570 B.C.) 1561 celestial phenomenon over Nuremberg 1566 celestial phenomenon over Basel José Bonilla observation (1883) Aurora (1897) 20th century Los Angeles (1942) Kenneth Arnold (1947) Roswell (1947) Mantell (1948) Chiles-Whitted (1948) Gorman Dogfight (1948) Mariana (1950) McMinnville photographs (1950) Sperry (1950) Lubbock Lights (1951) Carson Sink (1952) Nash-Fortenberry (1952) Washington, D.C. (1952) Flatwoods monster (1952) Ellsworth (1953) Kelly–Hopkinsville (1955) Lakenheath-Bentwaters (1956) Antônio Villas Boas (1957) Levelland (1957) Trindade Island (1958) Barney and Betty Hill abduction (1961) Lonnie Zamora incident (1964) Solway Firth Spaceman (1964) Exeter (1965) Kecksburg (1965) Westall (1966) Shag Harbour (1967) Pascagoula Abduction (1973) Travis Walton incident (1975) Allagash (1976) Tehran (1976) Petrozavodsk phenomenon (1977) Operação Prato (1977) Valentich disappearance (1978) Kaikoura Lights (1978) Robert Taylor incident (1979) Val Johnson incident (1979) Cash-Landrum incident (1980) Rendlesham Forest (1980) Trans-en-Provence (1981) Japan Air Lines (1986) Voronezh UFO incident (1989) Belgian UFO wave (1990) Varginha (1996) Phoenix Lights (1997) 21st century USS Nimitz UFO incident (2004) Campeche, Mexico (2004) O'Hare Airport (2006) Alderney (2007) Norway (2009) USS Theodore Roosevelt UFO incidents (2014) Confirmed hoaxes Maury Island incident Aztec, New Mexico, UFO incident Morristown UFO hoax Sightings by country Argentina Australia Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada China France India Indonesia Iran Italy Mexico New Zealand Norway Philippines Russia South Africa Spain (Canary Islands) Sweden Thailand United Kingdom United States Types of UFOs Black triangle Flying saucer Foo fighter Ghost rockets Green fireballs Mystery airship Space jellyfish Types of alleged extraterrestrial beings Energy beings Grey aliens Insectoids Little green men Nordic aliens Reptilian humanoids Studies The Flying Saucers Are Real (1947–1950) Project Sign (1948) Project Grudge (1949) Flying Saucer Working Party (1950) Project Magnet (1950–1962) Project Blue Book (1952–1970) Robertson Panel (1953) National Investigations Committee On Aerial Phenomena (1956-1980) Condon Report (1966–1968) Institute 22 (1978–?) Project Condign (1997–2000) Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (2007–2012) Identification studies of UFOs Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force (current) Hypotheses Ancient astronauts Cryptoterrestrial Extraterrestrial Interdimensional Psychosocial Nazi UFOs Trotskyist-Posadism Conspiracy theories Area 51 Storm Area 51 Bob Lazar Dulce Base Majestic 12 Men in black Project Serpo InvolvementAbduction claims History Entities Claimants Narrative Perspectives Insurance Other Implants Cattle mutilation Close encounter Contactee Crop circles Government responses GEIPAN Organizations Ufologists Culture Conventions Fiction Religions list Skepticism List of scientific skeptics Committee for Skeptical Inquiry Category Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hessdalen_lights&oldid=969790154" Categories: HoltålenAtmospheric ghost lightsWeather loreUFO-related phenomenaUnsolved problems in physicsHidden categories: CS1 Italian-language sources (it)CS1 Norwegian-language sources (no)All articles lacking reliable referencesArticles lacking reliable references from February 2020Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2010All articles containing potentially dated statementsWikipedia articles that are too technical from April 2016All articles that are too technical Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog in Namespaces ArticleTalk Variants Views ReadEditView history More Search Navigation Main pageContentsCurrent eventsRandom articleAbout WikipediaContact usDonateWikipedia store Contribute HelpCommunity portalRecent changesUpload file Tools What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationCite this pageWikidata item Print/export Download as PDFPrintable version Languages DanskDeutschEspañolفارسیFrançaisHrvatskiItalianoNorsk bokmålPortuguêsСрпски / srpskiSrpskohrvatski / српскохрватскиSuomiதமிழ்УкраїнськаاردوTiếng Việt中文 Edit links This page was last edited on 27 July 2020, at 12:48 (UTC) . Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Contact Wikipedia Mobile view Developers Statistics Cookie statement

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Hessdalen lights - Wikipedia, Killingdalen åpen for alt dame

HESSDALEN Holtålen municipality Pictures Map Hotel Guided tour Where is 3D map   PHENOMENA Pictures Film Description Observations this year Observations Theories   PROJECT Last news Articles Tech.Report,1984 History Talks The project in TV    ... radio    ... newspapers    ... journals   STATION Live TV - cam1 Live TV - cam2 (NW) Live TV - cam3 (SW) Live radar screen Alarms Pictures 2020 Pictures 2019 Pictures 2018 Pictures 2017 Pictures 2016 Pictures 2015 Pictures 2014 Pictures 2013 Pictures 2011 Pictures 2003 Pictures 2002 Pictures 2001 Pictures 2000 Pictures 1999 Pictures 1998 GCP The weather The weather at Skarvan Air traffic Technical description Where is   PEOPLE Student groups Student reports   OTHER How to become Links   Hits on this web Back to main       Project Hessdalen   Project Hessdalen is a project at Østfold University College Hessdalen is a small valley in the central part of Norway. At the end of 1981 through 1984, residents of the Valley became concerned and alarmed about strange, unexplained lights that appeared at many locations throughout the Valley. Hundreds of lights were observed. At the peak of activity there were about 20 reports a week. Project Hessdalen was established in the summer of 1983. A field investigation was carried out between 21.January and 26.February 1984. Fifty-three light observations were made during the field investigation. You may read the details in the technical report. There was an additional field investigation in the winter of 1985. However, no phenomena were seen during the period when the instruments were present. Lights are still being observed in the Hessdalen Valley, but their frequency has decreased to about 20 observations a year. An automatic measurement station was put up in Hessdalen in August 1998. Both data and alarm-pictures can be viewed on this website. What shall this "phenomena" be called? Earthlight? Min-min light? Unknown light? - Or, just: The "Hessdalsphenomena". Why is it important to observe and study this phenomenon? There are several answers to this question: Knowledge of the Hessdalenphenomenon may give us a better understanding of our world. .. Better knowledge of our world will give us a better understanding of the consequencies of our treatment of the natural environment. We know the light phenomena produces considerable luminous energy. Can a study of the Hessdalenphenomenon lead us to a new clean energy source? Todays mystery may be tomorrows technology. Scientific validation of the phenomenon will make it easier for people to disclose their personal observations. More candor about the phenomena, as well as other "unknown" phenomena, will facilitate legitimate research on all anomalies. Hopefully, understanding these anomalies and recognizing they exist, will bring new respect for the delicate balance of the Natural World. Partners: Copyright ©2000 Project Hessdalen. Webmaster : Erling Strand. All comments or questions about this web shall be send to Webmaster Last update 15 April 2015 13:38:56.

Project Hessdalen-Interesting pictures-2019

Hessdalen From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation Jump to search Village / Valley in Central Norway, NorwayHessdalenVillage / ValleyHessdalenLocation of the villageShow map of Trøndelag HessdalenHessdalen (Norway)Show map of Norway Coordinates: 62°47′36″N 11°11′18″E  /  62.7933°N 11.1883°E  / 62.7933; 11.1883 Coordinates: 62°47′36″N 11°11′18″E  /  62.7933°N 11.1883°E  / 62.7933; 11.1883 CountryNorwayRegionCentral NorwayCountyTrøndelagDistrictGauldalenMunicipalityHoltålenElevation[1]617 m (2,024 ft)Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET) • Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)Post Code7380 Ålen Hessdalen is a village in the municipality of Holtålen in Trøndelag county, Norway. Hessdalen also refers to the 15-kilometre (9.3 mi) long valley that surrounds the village. Hessdalen is located in the central part of the village, approximately 120 kilometres (75 mi) south of the city of Trondheim, approximately 35 kilometres (22 mi) north of the mining town of Røros, and about 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) southwest of the village of Renbygda. About 150 people live in the village and surrounding valley. Hessdalen Church is located in the village of Hessdalen and the lake Øyungen lies about 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) southwest of the village. The Hessdalen area is known for the occurrence of unexplained aerial luminous phenomena called the Hessdalen lights. The phenomenon is monitored by the Hessdalen AMS. Name [ edit] The first element is the name of the local river Hesja and the last element is the definite form of dal, which means "dale" or "valley". References [ edit] ^ "Hessdalen, Holtålen (Trøndelag)". yr.no. Retrieved 2018-01-16 . This Trøndelag location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.vte Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hessdalen&oldid=911103434" Categories: HoltålenValleys of TrøndelagVillages in TrøndelagTrøndelag geography stubsHidden categories: Articles with short descriptionShort description is different from WikidataCoordinates on WikidataAll stub articles Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog in Namespaces ArticleTalk Variants Views ReadEditView history More Search Navigation Main pageContentsCurrent eventsRandom articleAbout WikipediaContact usDonateWikipedia store Contribute HelpCommunity portalRecent changesUpload file Tools What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationCite this pageWikidata item Print/export Download as PDFPrintable version In other projects Wikimedia Commons Languages CebuanoČeštinaDeutschFrançaisBahasa MelayuNorsk bokmålNorsk nynorskSuomiSvenskaاردو Edit links This page was last edited on 16 August 2019, at 14:44 (UTC) . Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Contact Wikipedia Mobile view Developers Statistics Cookie statement

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